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The Phoenix Study Group of the Theosophical Society in America is an exciting group of seekers on the adventure to learn about many Spiritual Traditions and the root they have in common. As more people in the modern world are expressing that they are “spiritual” but not particularly “religious” Theosophy provides a wonderfully enlightening path.

 

 

Founded in 2000 as an official Study Group in Phoenix, we are dedicated to Helena Petrovna Blavatsky’s  intention of finding a synthesis of Science, Religion and Philosophy among the world’s great spiritual and philosophical traditions, as well as science and other esoteric systems including Hermeticism, Kabbalah, Alchemy and more.

 

We welcome all who wish to join us who are in agreement with the Theosophical Society’s Three Objects:

  • To form a nucleus of the universal brotherhood of humanity, without distinction of race, creed, sex, caste or color.
  • To encourage the comparative study of religion, philosophy and science.
  • To investigate unexplained laws of nature and the powers latent in humanity.

We sincerely hope that you will join us for a few meetings and get to know the Phoenix Study Group of the Theosophical Society in America, and participate in our stimulating discussions, to help you determine if Theosophy should be part of your path.

The term “Theosophy” comes from the Greek theosophia, which is composed of two words: theos (“god,” “gods,” or “divine”) and sophia (“wisdom”). Theosophia, therefore, may be translated as the “wisdom of the gods,” “wisdom in things divine,” or “divine wisdom.”

The word “theosophy” was first used in writing during the 3rd to the 6th century of our era by the Alexandrian Neo-Platonic philosophers. They used this term to denote an experiential knowledge that came through spiritual, not intellectual, means. In the course of time, several mystics and spiritual movements in the West (mainly Christian-based) adopted the word “theosophy” in their teachings.  Among them we can find Meister Eckhart in the 14th century, Jacob Boehme in the 17th century, and Emanuel Swedenborg in the 18th century, and others. In the last quarter of the 19th century Mme. Blavatsky, Col. Olcott, and a group of like-minded people, founded the Theosophical Society, thus bringing the term back into light again. They claimed the work of the TS was a continuation of previous Theosophists, especially that of the Greek and Alexandrian philosophers.

In the modern Theosophical movement the word “Theosophy” has been used with several different meanings:

  • a) It is frequently used to describe the body of teachings that were given through Mme. Blavatsky and other Theosophical writers. This body of knowledge is frequently called “modern Theosophy” (with capital T).

 

  • b) It is also used to refer to the universal Ancient Wisdom underlying all religions, which can be found at their core when they are stripped of accretions, deletions, and superstitions. This is sometimes referred to as “ancient” or “timeless” theosophy.

 

These two usages refer to a body of teachings transmitted by different sages, in different parts of the world, and at different times.

  • c) As we have seen, theosophia refers to a Divine Wisdom, that is, a state of consciousness in which the sage or mystic goes beyond his or her mind and gets a direct, supra-conceptual, perception of Truth. This is the primary meaning of Theosophy.

 

It is important to notice that the intellectual study and daily practice of Theosophy is only a means to reach the real theosophia, or inner enlightenment. As we become more mindful of this, we open the door to a flash of insight which comes from the part of us that is Divine. The process of becoming more and more receptive to these theosophical insights is the spiritual path.